Using Console / SSH commands

The SmartServer is based on the Linux operating system and many common Linux commands can be used to access the SmartServer through the SmartServer console or by using SSH. This section covers some of the most commonly used console/SSH commands for troubleshooting the SmartServer. Most commands can be issued using the apollo login. In some cases, you will need to add sudo to the beginning of the command for higher privileges. Always use the apollo user login and not root. Newer versions of the SmartServer restrict or prevent root login.

Many commands (like top) will continuously run until you exit the command, and therefore, should be run in an SSH session instead of the SmartServer console. A SSH session will disconnect when the PC is no longer able to access the SmartServer, and therefore stopping the continuous command. You can exit continuous commands by entering CTRL-C.

The table below describes and provides examples of console/SSH commands. To eliminate hidden characters, copy the commands to a text editor (e.g., notepad), and then copy the commands from the text editor and paste them into the SSH session.

For SmartServer 4.0 and higher, most log data is in /var/log/syslog. Use smartserverctl to access SmartServer services. For Karaf, use systemctl to check the Karaf service. 

For SmartServer 3.6 and prior releases, log data is distributed into specific log files, such as logs in /var/log/supervisor. Use supervisorctl to access SmartServer services.

For Karaf, use systemctl for all SmartServer versions to check the Karaf service. 


The commands shown in the table below assume that apollo login is used.


CommandDescription
apollo-reset

This command is used to reset the SmartServer database. If you want to keep any of the SmartServer configuration then you should save SmartServer configuration using the CMS Web page prior to using these commands

We recommend using the SmartServer Configuration Page System tab Reset to defaults button to reset the SmartServer database or restore to factory instead of using these commands.

This command should only be used for all SmartServer versions except 3.2x. So use it for SmartServer version 3.1 and earlier, or 3.3 and later.  Do NOT use for SmartServer versions  3.2 to 3.25 as the commands can damage the SmartServer.

Reset Database - resets the SmartServer database and re-configures MAC IDs assignment (with affects IP-852 routing and Internal device UIDs).  It does not change the SmartServer IP settings.

Format: 

sudo apollo-reset normal <apollo password>

Example: Reset Database with SmartServer password = kksdafdsj
sudo apollo-reset normal kksdafdsj

Restore to Factory - resets SmartServer database, and re-configures MAC IDs assignment (with affects IP-852 routing and Internal device UIDs), sets IP address settings to default and resets other driver configurations

Format: 

sudo apollo-reset factory <apollo password>

Example: Restore Factory Settings with SmartServer password = 432597787
sudo apollo-reset factory 432597787

cat

For SmartServer 3.6 and prior releases, this command allows you to read a file, and is most useful for reading small files. For longer files, use more.

Displays the contents of a log file
$cat /var/log/supervisor/lte.log
Displays the contents of a large log file
$more /var/log/supervisor/lte.log

For SmartServer 4.0 and higher, use the tail and grep commands since all the logs go into /var/log/syslog, which can be very large in size.

date

Displays the SmartServer platform current local time (time changes are not propagated to CMS). The SmartServer CMS and the SmartServer platform time and timezone may differ. See also timedatectl below.

Example: date
$ date
Mon Dec 12 15:10:56 PST 2022

Use timedatectl to change the time or date.

df

Displays system disk space usage. If your system disk space usage is close to 100%, then you may experience performance (e.g., slow response times) or operational (e.g., can't access CMS Web page) problems. 

Example: df
df -h


Example: df (healthy system)
$ df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/root 2.9G 2.3G 496M 83% /
devtmpfs 846M 0 846M 0% /dev
tmpfs 1007M 20K 1007M 1% /dev/shm
tmpfs 202M 4.8M 197M 3% /run
tmpfs 5.0M 0 5.0M 0% /run/lock
tmpfs 1007M 0 1007M 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mmcblk3p1 16M 14M 2.4M 85% /boot
/dev/mmcblk3p5 675M 33M 593M 6% /var/apollo
/dev/loop0 275M 320K 254M 1% /var/core
/dev/mmcblk2p1 30G 554M 28G 2% /media/sdcard

A /dev/root of 85% is acceptable; however, if it shows 100%, or another item shows close to 100%, then use the du command to determine which file is using the excessive memory.

du

Allows you to determine which files are using a lot of disk space. If the df -h command shows anything close to 100% for any of the items listed, then you can use this du command to help identify which files are the cause.

Some files are expected to be large while others are expected to be small. 

Go to the directory that shows 100%, or close to 100%, and search for files over 5MB.

Example: Looks for directories over 1 MB
sudo du -t 1M -x -s -h *

A large file does not mean it is a problem. You should compare the results with another working SmartServer. If you find a file on a SmartServer that is much larger than the same file on another SmartServer, then you should look at that file. 

For example, if /dev/root shows 100% usage, change to the root directory run the du command.

$ cd /
$ sudo du -t 1M -x -s -h *
14M     boot
1.1E    etc
191M    home
du: cannot access 'proc/831/task/831/fd/3': No such file or directory
du: cannot access 'proc/831/task/831/fdinfo/3': No such file or directory
du: cannot access 'proc/831/fd/3': No such file or directory
du: cannot access 'proc/831/fdinfo/3': No such file or directory
du: cannot read directory 'proc/32610/task/32610/net': Invalid argument
du: cannot read directory 'proc/32610/net': Invalid argument
26M     root
1.1M    run
1.8G    usr
264M    var

Lines starting with du: cannot access can be ignored. 

If a file appears to be too large, then go to that directory and run the du command again.

You can then issue the ls -lh command to see which files use a lot of space.

echo

This command can be used to determine the SmartServer software version.

The SmartServer software version will also be displayed when you log into the SmartServer console/SSH.

Example: Determines SmartServer version
echo $APOLLO_VERSION
Example: echo
$ echo $APOLLO_VERSION
3.60.016
grep

Displays any line in a file that has the specified text.

Example: Searches for any indication of EMI?
sudo grep "EMI?" /var/log/syslog
history

Displays the previously issued SSH commands. This list is not cleared when the console/SSH session is terminated.

Example: Displays history
history


Example: Clears history
history -c
journalctl

Use this command to monitor output to syslog. Use this command instead of tail -f /var/log/syslog because this command will tolerate log rotation.  

Example: shows logged output of all the units in the SmartServer
journalctl -f 
Example: shows the logged output of the lte driver
journalctl -f -u
ifconfig

Displays the SmartServer hardware interfaces, like Ethernet IP Address, U60/U70 interfaces, and IOX.

Example: ifconfig
ifconfig


Example: eth0 is the LAN port, eth1 is the WAN port, IP70 is the SmartServer backbone, lon# (lon0) refers to a U60/U70
$ ifconfig
eth0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 192.168.92.3  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 192.168.92.255
        inet6 fe80::200:ff:fe00:5  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 00:d0:71:0a:e3:3c  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 11630  bytes 845821 (845.8 KB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 11644  bytes 785215 (785.2 KB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

eth1: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 10.0.0.113  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 10.0.0.255
        inet6 fe80::200:ff:fe00:5  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 00:d0:71:0a:e3:3d  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 263942  bytes 66959105 (66.9 MB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 292136  bytes 183708154 (183.7 MB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

ip70: flags=4291<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,NOARP,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 172.24.25.128  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 172.24.25.255
        inet6 fe80::2d0:71ff:fe0a:e341  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 00:d0:71:0a:e3:41  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 223936  bytes 11910231 (11.9 MB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

lo: flags=73<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING>  mtu 65536
        inet 127.0.0.1  netmask 255.0.0.0
        inet6 ::1  prefixlen 128  scopeid 0x10<host>
        loop  txqueuelen 1000  (Local Loopback)
        RX packets 7081807  bytes 1530678946 (1.5 GB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 7081807  bytes 1530678946 (1.5 GB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

lon0: flags=67<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING>  mtu 1280
        inet 44.111.199.120  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 44.111.199.255
        unspec 00-D0-71-10-08-AE-30-30-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00  txqueuelen 10  (UNSPEC)
        RX packets 112368  bytes 2040716 (2.0 MB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 225088  bytes 1491920 (1.4 MB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

If all of your LON devices are down, then use ifconfig to look for lon# or check the System Configuration page LON tab to see if the U60/U70 appears.

To see traffic on a U60/U70, determine the lon# (e.g., lon0) and use the ifconfig command to look at TX and RX packets. Re-issue the command a couple of seconds later.

Example: ifconfig lon0
ifconfig lon0
ifconfig lon0
Example: ifconfig lon0 results
$ ifconfig lon0
lon0: flags=67<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING>  mtu 1280
        inet 44.137.199.120  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 44.137.199.255
        unspec 00-D0-71-14-BF-43-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00  txqueuelen 10  (UNSPEC)
        RX packets 258937  bytes 4487024 (4.4 MB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 535757  bytes 3206752 (3.2 MB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

$ ifconfig lon0
lon0: flags=67<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING>  mtu 1280
        inet 44.137.199.120  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 44.137.199.255
        unspec 00-D0-71-14-BF-43-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00  txqueuelen 10  (UNSPEC)
        RX packets 259032  bytes 4488670 (4.4 MB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 535947  bytes 3208090 (3.2 MB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0
lscpu

Displays the number of CPUs that are available with the SmartServer. See CPU(s) in the command output. This information is used to determine whether you have Quad Core or Dual Core SmartServer.

Example: lscpu
$ lscpu
Architecture:        armv7l
Byte Order:          Little Endian
CPU(s):              4
On-line CPU(s) list: 0-3
Thread(s) per core:  1
Core(s) per socket:  4
Socket(s):           1
Vendor ID:           ARM
Model:               10
Model name:          Cortex-A9
Stepping:            r2p10
CPU max MHz:         792.0000
CPU min MHz:         396.0000
BogoMIPS:            6.00
Flags:               half thumb fastmult vfp edsp neon vfpv3 tls vfpd32
lsusb

Determines if you are using a U60/U7 as indicated with Echelon Co.

Example: Device 003 indicates a U60/U70
$ lsusb
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 0781:5571 SanDisk Corp. Cruzer Fit
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0920:5550 Echelon Co. USB2.0 Hub
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 05e3:0610 Genesys Logic, Inc. 4-port hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 1618:9113 Redpine Signals, Inc. Wireless USB Network Module
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
mosquitto_sub

Subscribes to an MQTT topic (see IAP/MQ for more details). These commands should only be run using SSH and NOT using the console. Enter CTRL-C to exit. 

Example: Views all devices
mosquitto_sub -v -t glp/0/+/fb/dev/+/+/cfg


Example: Views all events
mosquitto_sub -v -t glp/0/+/ev/data/#


Example: Views all MQTT traffic (with timestamp)
mosquitto_sub -v -t "#" -F "%I %t\n %p"


Example: Saves all MQTT traffic (with timestamp) to a file - only let run temporarily as may use up a lot of disk space
mosquitto_sub -v -t "#" -F "%I %t\n %p" >  /var/apollo/data/mqtt.log
mosquitto_pub

Writes using an MQTT topic (see IAP/MQ for more details).

Use caution with this command and the topics to which you write.

Example: mosquitto_pub
mosquitto_pub -t glp/0/17q3awh/rq/dev/lon/5/if/lamp/0 {"nviValue":{"value":{"value":75,"state":1}}}
pmic_checker.sh

Used to check the SmartServer PMIC version.

Older SmartServer software version may not support newer SmartServer hardware version since the CPU, PMIC, or memory may have changed and the older software is not aware of the new hardware. Using the wrong software version may cause the SmartServer to stop working and be unrecoverable.

PMIC:

  • PFUZE100 – supported by all Software versions.
  • DA9063 – only supported in SmartServer 3.30.057 and higher. SmartServer 3.30.05 and higher support this PMIC. If you downgrade the SmartServer below 3.30.057, then the SmartServer will stop working and you will invalidate your warranty.

Determining the SmartServer PMIC
sudo /root/.setup/pmic/pmic_checker.sh


Example determine the SmartServer PMIC
sudo /root/.setup/pmic/pmic_checker.sh
[sudo] password for apollo:
DA9063
reboot

Reboots the SmartServer. You can use this method if you cannot reboot the SmartServer using the System Configuration page. Once you issue the command, there is a short delay before the SmartServer reboots.

Example: reboot
sudo reboot
re-image.sh

Starts the re-image script. You first have to plug in a USB flash drive with the SmartServer flash drive image (unzipped files), and then run this command. See also Updating or Re-imaging the SmartServer with the SmartServer Console.

Example: re-image script
sudo /media/usb0/re-image.sh
smartserver-secure

With SmartServer 3.5 and higher, this command is used to enable/disable enhanced security and is the same as using the Enable Enhanced Security setting on the System Configuration page. Enhanced security defaults to being enabled.

Enable enhanced security
sudo smartserver-secure +all
Disable enhanced security
sudo smartserver-secure -all

To disable only password time checking and enable all other enhanced security features:

Disable enhanced security password checking
sudo smartserver-secure -pwd
su

Switches to higher permissions so that you do not have to add sudo before console/SSH commands.

Example: su, switches to higher permissions
$ su
Password:


Example: exit, exits higher permissions
exit
smartserverctl
For SmartServer 4.0 and higher

Checks the status of SmartServer services and shows built-in services, like bacnet, which is used for BACnet, and any internal device application.

Example: smartserverctl
sudo smartserverctl status
Example: smartserverctl status
$ smartserverctl status
alarm                              ACTIVE              1h 4min
bacnet                             ACTIVE              1h 4min
core                               ACTIVE              1h 4min
datapoint-connection-manager       ACTIVE              1h 4min
datapoint-controller               ACTIVE              1h 4min
datapoint-get                      ACTIVE              1h 4min
enocean-driver                     ACTIVE              1h 4min
formatter                          ACTIVE              1h 4min
housekeeper                        ACTIVE              1h 4min
iap-controller                     ACTIVE              1h 4min
init                               ACTIVE              1h 4min
lim                                ACTIVE              1h 4min
loader                             ACTIVE              1h 4min
logger                             ACTIVE              1h 4min
lon                                ACTIVE              1h 4min
lte                                ACTIVE              1h 4min
ltx                                ACTIVE              1h 4min
lwd                                ACTIVE              1h 4min
modbus                             ACTIVE              1h 4min
monitoring                         ACTIVE              1h 4min
mosquitto                          ACTIVE              1h 4min
node-red                           ACTIVE              1h 4min
pyro4-ns                           ACTIVE              1h 4min
query                              ACTIVE              1h 4min
reboot-manager                     ACTIVE              1h 4min
resource-publisher                 ACTIVE              1h 4min
scheduler                          ACTIVE              1h 4min
secmount                           ACTIVE              1h 4min
services                           ACTIVE              1h 4min
smartserver                        ACTIVE              1h 4min
storage-manager                    ACTIVE              1h 4min
apollo@smartserver-17qam88:~$

Most services have roughly the same uptime. If the uptime for one service is very different from others, then this may mean that the service was restarted.

LTE and LTX  services may have different uptimes than the rest of the services. These services are re-started automatically each time you import or re-import an XIF or resource file set XML files. They may also get restarted due to other normal processing. The example below shows how to restart both the LTE and LTX services using a single command.

Example: Restarts both LON services (LTE and LTX)
sudo smartserverctl restart lon
Example: Restarts all services
sudo smartserverctl reload
Example: Disables automatic start on boot for a given services or groups
# smartserverctl disable service [service ...]

Disable service command

Issuing only the disable service command does not stop the service from running. The service will continue to run and will only be stopped after a reboot or by issuing the stop command as well. If you want to stop the service from running, then issue the following commands:

# smartserverctl stop service [service ...]
# smartserverctl disable service [service ...]
supervisorctl

For SmartServer 3.6 and prior releases, this command checks the status of SmartServer services and shows built-in services, like echbacnet, which is used for BACnet, and any internal device application.

Example: supervisorctl
sudo supervisorctl status
Example: supervisorctl status
$ sudo supervisorctl status
apollo-init                      EXITED    Dec 15 06:57 AM
core:echhousekeeper              RUNNING   pid 1183, uptime 2:54:05
core:echlim                      RUNNING   pid 1189, uptime 2:54:05
echbacnet                        RUNNING   pid 1167, uptime 2:54:05
echmodbus                        RUNNING   pid 1259, uptime 2:54:03
echopcua-server                  STOPPED   Not started
lon:echlte                       RUNNING   pid 3497, uptime 2:52:29
lon:echltx                       RUNNING   pid 3496, uptime 2:52:29
ready                            EXITED    Dec 15 06:57 AM
services:echalarm                RUNNING   pid 1239, uptime 2:54:04
services:echapollo-rp-launch     RUNNING   pid 1250, uptime 2:54:03
services:echconnection           RUNNING   pid 1241, uptime 2:54:04
services:echdatapointcontrol     RUNNING   pid 1244, uptime 2:54:04
services:echdatapointget         RUNNING   pid 1248, uptime 2:54:04
services:echformatter            RUNNING   pid 1249, uptime 2:54:04
services:echiap-controller       RUNNING   pid 1255, uptime 2:54:03
services:echloader               RUNNING   pid 1238, uptime 2:54:04
services:echlogger               RUNNING   pid 1212, uptime 2:54:04
services:echmonitoring           RUNNING   pid 1224, uptime 2:54:04
services:echquery                RUNNING   pid 1232, uptime 2:54:04
services:echscheduler            RUNNING   pid 1252, uptime 2:54:03

Most services have roughly the same uptime. If the uptime for one service is very different from others, then this may mean that the service was restarted.

LTE (lon:echlte) and LTX (lon:echltx) services may have different uptimes than the rest of the services. These services are re-started automatically each time you import or re-import an XIF or resource file set XML files. They may also get restarted due to other normal processing. The example below shows how to restart both the LTE and LTX services using a single command.

Example: Restarts both LON services
sudo supervisorctl restart lon:


Example: Restarts all services
sudo supervisorctl reload

For SmartServer 4.0 and higher, see smartserverctl.

systemctl

For SmartServer 3.6 and prior releases, this command determines if the CMS has started, even if you cannot log into the CMS.  The CMS is typically accessible within five minutes after the Change Password button becomes enabled on the System Configuration page.

If the SmartServer is been up for 15 minutes, then most likely the CMS is up. If you can access the Configuration pages and console/SSH, but not the CMS, then issue the following command.

Example: systemctl
sudo systemctl status karaf
Example: Checks if CMS (Karaf) service is up; green text is a good indicator
/$ sudo systemctl status karaf
● karaf.service - karaf
     Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/karaf.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
    Drop-In: /etc/systemd/system/karaf.service.d
             └─override.conf
     Active: active (running) since Mon 2023-01-09 07:27:17 PST; 9h ago
   Main PID: 1689 (karaf-wrapper)
     Memory: 513.7M
     CGroup: /system.slice/karaf.service
             ├─1689 /home/apollo/echelon-container-devel-3.60.016/bin/karaf-wrapper /home/apollo/echelon-container-devel-3.60.016/etc/karaf-wrapper.conf wrapper.syslog.ident=karaf wrapper.>
             └─1705 /usr/lib/jvm/java-11-openjdk-armhf/bin/java -Dkaraf.instances=/home/apollo/echelon-container-devel-3.60.016/instances -Dkaraf.home=/home/apollo/echelon-container-devel->

Warning: journal has been rotated since unit was started, output may be incomplete.
lines 1-12/12 (END)

The following command shows whether or not Karaf service is up. If you see active (running) in green, then this means that the service is up. However, it does not guarantee that Karaf (CMS) is fully working.

If you cannot reach the SmartServer Configuration pages (nginx) and other services, then enter the following commands:

sudo systemctl status
sudo systemctl list-units --state=failed
tail

Displays the end of a file and also displays all new entries. This command should only be used with SSH. Enter CTRL-C to exit. 

For SmartServer release 4.0 and higher
tail -10f /var/log/syslog

tail -f /var/log/syslog


For SmartServer 3.6 and prior releases.
tail -10f /var/log/supervisor/lte.log

tail -f /var/log/supervisor/lte.log
tar

Creates tape archive files (i.e., a Linux zip file). Once you tar-up a file, you can then copy it to your PC and un-tar it with an application like 7-Zip.

For SmartServer 4.0 and higher, use the SmartServer System Configuration page Logs button to download the SmartServer log files. Most of the driver logs are included in the SmartServer 4.0 and higher /var/log/syslog.

For SmartServer 3.6 and prior, use the following commands to get the SmartServer log files.

To retrieve the SmartServer log files (most, but not all, built-in log files), use the commands shown in the example below to tar and copy the /var/log and then save into /var/data//var/apollo/data/logs.tar.gz. The chown command is used to change the tar file so that you can copy the tar file with the apollo login.

Example: Retrieves SmartServer files
sudo tar -czvf /var/apollo/data/logs.tar.gz /var/log

sudo chown apollo /var/apollo/data/logs.tar.gz

Use an SFTP application (like WinSCP) to save the files to your PC. You can then use 7-Zip (or a similar application) to extract the files.

timedatectl

Displays or sets the SmartServer platform time (time changes are not propagated to CMS). The SmartServer CMS and the SmartServer platform time and timezone may differ. See also date above.

Example: timedatectl
$ timedatectl
Local time: Mon 2022-12-12 14:52:58 PST
Universal time: Mon 2022-12-12 22:52:58 UTC
RTC time: Mon 2022-12-12 22:52:58
Time zone: America/Los_Angeles (PST, -0800)
System clock synchronized: yes
NTP service: active
RTC in local TZ: no
Change SmartServer time and date
timedatectl set-ntp false
timedatectl set-time "2023-05-04 07:46:00"
timedatectl

Note: you will first have to disable the Smartserver time server first before changing the time or date. it is possible that the CMS and SmartServer platform may be out of sync. Reboot the SmartServer if you see an issue.

Re-enable the SmartServer time server
timedatectl set-ntp true
top

Provides a dynamic, real-time view of a running SmartServer system. Enter CTRL-C to exit. 

Idle time

id shows the idle time. A large number (65.1 in the example below) for idle time indicates that the SmartServer has a lot of time extra processing time. 

This command can be used to determine whether the SmartServer is performing a software update using the GLPO file. When a GLPO update is in progress, you will see wget, followed by unzip, and then mender using the most resources. The CPU will go down as the update nears completion.

Example: top
$top
top - 14:11:24 up  7:04,  1 user,  load average: 3.45, 2.77, 2.40
Tasks: 183 total,   4 running, 178 sleeping,   0 stopped,   1 zombie
%Cpu(s): 21.6 us, 12.2 sy,  0.0 ni, 65.1 id,  0.3 wa,  0.0 hi,  0.8 si,  0.0 st
KiB Mem :  2060972 total,   560516 free,  1259012 used,   241444 buff/cache
KiB Swap:        0 total,        0 free,        0 used.   707228 avail Mem

  PID USER      PR  NI    VIRT    RES    SHR S  %CPU  %MEM     TIME+ COMMAND
 1549 apollo    20   0  756796 519496   6832 S   5.2  25.2  86:18.16 java
 6649 postgres  20   0  209740  60356  53252 S   4.1   2.9   1:17.62 postgres
    1 root      20   0   36624   9032   4612 R   2.7   0.4  36:20.92 systemd
 1372 apollo    20   0   89500   5704   4128 S   2.4   0.3  39:01.07 echbacnet
  499 message+  20   0    6096   2836   2348 R   2.3   0.1  25:53.07 dbus-daem+
 2978 apollo    20   0  181160  14216   4548 S   2.0   0.7  23:35.19 runner
  733 apollo    20   0    7460   4860   3500 S   1.4   0.2  15:24.15 mosquitto
 1522 apollo    20   0   22092   3620   2728 S   1.4   0.2  26:14.44 echmodbus
 1947 apollo    20   0  198984  58696  11908 S   1.4   2.8  14:47.22 echltx
  674 apollo    20   0  197464  57460   9060 S   1.2   2.8  11:07.83 node-red
  508 root      20   0   12952   4268   3604 S   1.1   0.2  12:04.99 systemd-l+
  837 apollo    20   0   32332   2876   2052 S   0.4   0.1   6:28.37 redis-ser+
 1484 apollo    20   0  185992  49016   9080 S   0.4   2.4   9:19.66 echalarm
12377 apollo    20   0    4716   2212   1712 R   0.4   0.1   0:00.80 top
 1006 root      20   0    6524   2308   1924 S   0.3   0.1   2:39.87 ledscript+
 1501 apollo    20   0  173396  33868   7804 S   0.2   1.6   3:50.14 echdpget
   10 root      20   0       0      0      0 R   0.2   0.0   2:39.28 rcu_preem+
ufw

Displays which ports are open, and also opens/closes ports.

Example: Displays port status
$ sudo ufw status
Status: active

To                         Action      From
--                         ------      ----
22                         ALLOW       Anywhere
80                         ALLOW       Anywhere
5353                       ALLOW       Anywhere
2541/udp                   ALLOW       Anywhere
8883                       ALLOW       Anywhere
1883                       ALLOW       Anywhere
47808/udp                  ALLOW       Anywhere
47809/udp                  ALLOW       Anywhere
41797/udp                  ALLOW       Anywhere
443                        ALLOW       Anywhere

47808/udp                  ALLOW OUT   Anywhere
47809/udp                  ALLOW OUT   Anywhere
49152:65535/udp            ALLOW OUT   Anywhere


Example: Opens a port
sudo ufw allow 1883

sudo ufw allow 50012/tcp


Example: Closes the port that was opened
sudo ufw delete allow 50012/tcp
uptime

The amount of time that the SmartServer has been up since last reboot

Example showing that SmartServer has been up 5 hours 21 minutes
$ uptime
 11:40:49 up  5:21,  1 user,  load average: 1.47, 1.48, 1.51